American election essay

In one of the biggest upsets in American political history, Donald Trump won a truly historic victory in the U. Right up until Tuesday afternoon, therefore, a comfortable victory for Clinton seemed like a foregone conclusion.

American election essay

Publius Decius Mus September 5, is the Flight 93 election: You may die anyway. You—or the leader of your party—may make it into the cockpit and not know how to fly or land the plane. There are no guarantees. To compound the metaphor: With Trump, at least you can spin the cylinder and take your chances.

To ordinary conservative ears, this sounds histrionic. Can things really be so bad if eight years of Obama can be followed by eight more of Hillary, and yet Constitutionalist conservatives can still reasonably hope for a restoration of our cherished ideals?

Not to pick too much on Kesler, who is less unwarrantedly optimistic than most conservatives. And who, at least, poses the right question: The truth is that Trump articulated, if incompletely and inconsistently, the right stances on the right issues—immigration, trade, and war—right from the beginning.

But let us back up. One of the paradoxes—there are so many—of conservative thought over the last decade at least is the unwillingness even to entertain the possibility that America and the West are on a trajectory toward something very bad.

On the one hand, conservatives routinely present a litany of ills plaguing the body politic. Massive, expensive, intrusive, out-of-control government.

Ever-higher taxes and ever-deteriorating services and infrastructure. Inability to win wars against tribal, sub-Third-World foes.

And so on and drearily on. Conservatives spend at least several hundred million dollars a year on think-tanks, magazines, conferences, fellowships, and such, complaining about this, that, the other, and everything. And yet these same conservatives are, at root, keepers of the status quo.

Oh, sure, they want some things to change. They want their pet ideas adopted—tax deductions for having more babies and the like.

Many of them are even good ideas. But are any of them truly fundamental? Do they get to the heart of our problems? A recent article by Matthew Continetti may be taken as representative—indeed, almost written for the purpose of illustrating the point.

What does Continetti propose to do about it? Decentralization and federalism are all well and good, and as a conservative, I endorse them both without reservation.

But how are they going to save, or even meaningfully improve, the America that Continetti describes? What can they do against a tidal wave of dysfunction, immorality, and corruption? A step has been skipped in there somewhere.

Wishing for a tautology to enact itself is not a strategy.

American election essay

But the phrases that Continetti quotes are taken from Ross Douthat and Reihan Salam, both of whom, like Continetti, are vociferously—one might even say fanatically—anti-Trump.

I expect a Claremont scholar to be wiser than most other conservative intellectuals, and I am relieved not to be disappointed in this instance. Yet we may also reasonably ask: What explains the Pollyanna-ish declinism of so many others?

Looking on the bright side, perhaps this election can teach conservatives to look on the dark side. They need a talent for pessimism, recognizing the signs that whatever remains of American. Campaign. While the election was a re-match of the election, it ushered in a new type of American politics, a two-party republic and acrimonious campaigning behind the scenes and through the regardbouddhiste.com top of this, the election pitted the "larger than life" Adams and Jefferson, who were former close allies turned political enemies. Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

If so, like Chicken Little, they should stick a sock in it. Pecuniary reasons also suggest themselves, but let us foreswear recourse to this explanation until we have disproved all the others. Whatever the reason for the contradiction, there can be no doubt that there is a contradiction.The National Fury -- at Government, Politicians, the Electoral Process -- Is Overwhelming Not Just Bill Clinton’s Presidency, But Also Our Basic Faith in Democracy Itself.

Apr 26,  · (Getty/Mark Wallheiser/Drew Angerer) Are American voters actually just stupid? A new poll suggests the answer may be “yes” ABC News poll suggests that if we ran the election all over again.

American election essay

Chris Buskirk is the editor and publisher of American Greatness and cohost of the Seth & Chris Show on am KKNT. He was a Publius Fellow at the Claremont Institute and received a fellowship from the Earhart Foundation. A serial entrepreneur who has built and sold businesses in financial services and digital marketing, Chris has also studied political philosophy at the graduate level, his.

Buy American Greatness: How Conservatism Inc. Missed the Election and What the D.C. Establishment Needs to Learn: Read 11 Books Reviews - regardbouddhiste.com Choose the Right Synonym for election.

choice, option, alternative, preference, selection, election mean the act or opportunity of choosing or the thing chosen. choice suggests the opportunity or privilege of choosing freely.

freedom of choice option implies a power to choose that is specifically granted or guaranteed. the option of paying now or later alternative implies a need to choose one. By: Publius Decius Mus September 5, is the Flight 93 election: charge the cockpit or you die. You may die anyway.

You—or the leader of your party—may make it into the cockpit and not know how to fly or land the plane.

United States presidential election, - Wikipedia